Flying Foxes & Bats of Canada

Of Eastern Canada, the Eastern Pipistrelle is the smallest of Canada’s indigenous bat species in the area. It is also known to have a habitat range of Southern Ontario, the Southernmost parts of Quebec, most of Nova Scotia and part of New Brunswick, and is a tricoloured bat, with a grey base, yellow body and tipped with brown in fur color. They migrate to caves as hibernaculums in both late summer and early autumn and are decidedly slow flyers, preferring slow rivers and adjacent forests and woodlands of the area.

Also native to Eastern Canada is the Eastern Small-footed bat, who is one of the smallest North American bats known, and is one of the least common in Canada. Its range is restricted to deciduous and coniferous forests and it is a cold-tolerant bat. It enters hibernation later than most other species (usually late November or early December) and is identified by slow and erratic flight.

Of Western Canada, the California myotis, Fringed myotis, Keen’s myotis, Long-eared myotis, Long-legged myotis, Western big-eared bat, Western small-footed bat and Yuma myotis reside there. Many of these species are found in British Columbia and some both British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Flying Foxes

Flying foxes, which are fruit bats, vary largely in species native to Australia, typically rain forests. Many prefer their roosts as eucalyptus trees.

      • Hanging Bats. High quality vintage art reproduction by Buyenlarge. One of many…

3 comments on “Flying Foxes & Bats of Canada

  1. anne leueen says:

    We used to have a cottage on a lake in the Kawarthas in Southern Ontario and bats lived in the roof space. We could hear them flying out at night. They made little squeaking noises and it sounded like they pushed off from the roof as they flew away. As we were told they eat mosquitoes we were happy to have them. We were never there in the winter so I do not know where they hibernated.

    Liked by 1 person

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