Greyhound Racing

Greyhound racing is a competitive sport for which betting on the outcome is allowed to the public. Greyhound racing is organized into two forms, specifically running a normally oval track, and coursing. Track racing is known for the use of an artificial lure, which travels ahead of the competitors throughout the race and subsides when the finish line has been passed.

Greyhound racing is purely amateur in many countries, with the exception of Australia, Ireland, Macau, Mexico, Spain, the US and the UK; for those countries, greyhound racing is a part of the gambling industry, and though similar, it is far less profitable than horse racing. In some countries, the dog trainers of commercial racing industries illegally use live baiting. Animal rights and animal welfare groups are critical of the welfare of dogs participating in those greyhound racing industries, and a greyhound adoption movement was aroused to assist retired racing dogs into the finding of new homes; for this, there is an estimated 90% adoption rate in the US.

In the year 2016, a bill to ban greyhound racing was passed in the government of New South Wales, in Australia. This new law was supposed to come into effect in the middle of 2017,  but it was reversed in late 2016, although with several restrictions new to the industry.

[Greyhounds rounding a bend]

    Greyhound adoption groups frequently reported that dogs retired from the racetrack had tooth problems; the cause was debated. The groups also found that often the adopted greyhounds carried tick-born diseases and parasites which resulted from improper preventive treatments. Overall, animal welfare was critical of the greyhound racing industries, which they thought to be cruel, inhumane and concealing evidence of wrongdoing; for those reasons specifically, it was a large source of controversy in the 1980s.

 

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